Monday, August 21, 2017
  1. Politics

    Why Bannon Had to Go

    Elizabeth Drew
    Politics

    Why Bannon Had to Go

    1

     calls the former White House chief strategist and Donald Trump a "mismatch made in hell."

    Steve Bannon Getty Images
    In many, if not most, US administrations, some figure emerges who convinces the press that the president simply couldn’t function without him. But, as the dismissal of White House Chief Strategist Stephen Bannon has once again shown, such fixtures of the modern presidency are almost never indispensable. READ MORE
  2. World Affairs

    Guilty Man

    Nina L. Khrushcheva
  3. Culture & Society

    Trumpism and the Philosophy of History

    Mark S. Weiner
    Culture & Society

    Trumpism and the Philosophy of History

    3

     warns that while Stephen Bannon has left the White House, his malign ideological influence remains.

    US National Archieves Uschools/Getty Images
    With the departure of Stephen Bannon, liberals may be tempted to maintain the strategic tack they took during the presidential campaign, when they criticized Donald Trump mainly for his temperament, not his ideas, and by implication characterized his followers on the same basis. That would be a profound mistake. READ MORE
  4. World Affairs

    The Guardian of the Liberal World Order

    Ana Palacio
    World Affairs

    The Guardian of the Liberal World Order

    30

     explains why the duty to defend the Western-led rules-based system falls squarely on Europe.

    Military Museum of Chinese People's Revolution China photos/Getty Images
    The global financial crisis, which began ten years ago this month, showed that the Western-led rules-based international order’s long-term survival is not inevitable. Should that system collapse, nobody stands to lose more than Europe, which has long thrived on cooperation, and suffered under competition. READ MORE
  5. Economics

    The Lost Lesson of the Financial Crisis

    Mohamed A. El-Erian
    Economics

    The Lost Lesson of the Financial Crisis

    55

     argues that advanced economies still haven't done enough to fix their flawed growth models.

    A man walks past BNP Paribas bank Fred Dufour/Getty Images
    When the global financial crisis began ten years ago this month, policymakers in advanced economies treated it as a cyclical shock rather than an epochal event. Because they misdiagnosed the sickness, they administered the wrong medicine, and advanced economies have struggled to achieve strong, inclusive growth ever since. READ MORE

Video

How Long Can the Eurozone Survive Without Greater Integration?

Kenneth Rogoff examines the long-term prospects for Europe’s single-currency.

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