Submission Guidelines

Project Syndicate welcomes unsolicited submissions, representing a broad range of academic and professional fields and points of view, by qualified authors from around the world. Prospective contributors are encouraged to familiarize themselves with Project Syndicate’s offerings when considering whether their submission addresses a relevant topic.

Authors should note that Project Syndicate’s mission is to provide its member publications with original commentary that analyzes, rather than reports on, current global events and trends, thereby giving deeper meaning and context to their coverage. Contributors typically have demonstrated expertise on, or related to, the topic they are addressing.

Prospective contributors should adhere to the following guidelines:

  • The submission must be in English, accompanied by a brief note containing a short description of the commentary and the author’s qualifications.
  • The submission must be exclusive to Project Syndicate. Submissions that have been published elsewhere in any form and in any language, in print or online, will not be considered.
  • The submission should be made directly by the author or author’s staff. Public-relations representatives are requested to advise their clients accordingly.
  • The ideal length of a Project Syndicate commentary is 800-900 words. Submissions should not be shorter than 700 words or exceed 1,000 words.
  • Project Syndicate commentaries are aimed at a knowledgeable non-specialist audience. Submissions may not contain footnotes or endnotes, though they should include, wherever possible, links to cited data, quotes, speeches, reports, or academic research.
  • Accompanying images, graphs, or figures should be at least 540 pixels wide and should be submitted in JPEG or PNG format. We prefer to create graphs in-house, so inclusion of raw data sets is recommended. We reserve the right not to use such materials.

In some cases, submissions are accepted for online-only use. These commentaries appear on Project Syndicate’s website but are not syndicated to our member publications.

Authors whose submissions have been accepted are notified as quickly as possible. All questions regarding an accepted submission should be directed to the relevant Project Syndicate editor. Authors are requested not to contact Project Syndicate’s Prague office regarding the status of an accepted submission.

Unfortunately, we cannot respond to every submission. Prospective contributors who do not receive a reply within five days should feel free to submit their manuscript elsewhere.

To submit an unsolicited commentary to Project Syndicate, please email submissions@project-syndicate.org.

  1. Sean Gallup/Getty Images

    Angela Merkel’s Endgame?

    The collapse of coalition negotiations has left German Chancellor Angela Merkel facing a stark choice between forming a minority government or calling for a new election. But would a minority government necessarily be as bad as Germans have traditionally thought?

  2. Trump Trade speech Bill Pugliano/Getty Images .

    Preparing for the Trump Trade Wars

    In the first 11 months of his presidency, Donald Trump has failed to back up his words – or tweets – with action on a variety of fronts. But the rest of the world's governments, and particularly those in Asia and Europe, would be mistaken to assume that he won't follow through on his promised "America First" trade agenda.

  3. A GrabBike rider uses his mobile phone Bay Ismoyo/Getty Images

    The Platform Economy

    While developed countries in Europe, North America, and Asia are rapidly aging, emerging economies are predominantly youthful. Nigerian, Indonesian, and Vietnamese young people will shape global work trends at an increasingly rapid pace, bringing to bear their experience in dynamic informal markets on a tech-enabled gig economy.

  4. Trump Mario Tama/Getty Images

    Profiles in Discouragement

    One day, the United States will turn the page on Donald Trump. But, as Americans prepare to observe their Thanksgiving holiday, they should reflect that their country's culture and global standing will never recover fully from the wounds that his presidency is inflicting on them.

  5. Mugabe kisses Grace JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP/Getty Images

    How Women Shape Coups

    In Zimbabwe, as in all coups, much behind-the-scenes plotting continues to take place in the aftermath of the military's overthrow of President Robert Mugabe. But who the eventual winners and losers are may depend, among other things, on the gender of the plotters.

  6. Oil barrels Ahmad Al-Rubaye/Getty Images

    The Abnormality of Oil

    At the 2017 Abu Dhabi Petroleum Exhibition and Conference, the consensus among industry executives was that oil prices will still be around $60 per barrel in November 2018. But there is evidence to suggest that the uptick in global growth and developments in Saudi Arabia will push the price as high as $80 in the meantime.

  7. Israeli soldier Menahem Kahana/Getty Images

    The Saudi Prince’s Dangerous War Games

    Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is working hard to consolidate power and establish his country as the Middle East’s only hegemon. But his efforts – which include an attempt to trigger a war between Israel and Hezbollah in Lebanon – increasingly look like the work of an immature gambler.