Climate change protest

Building Climate Trust

The UN Climate Change Conference in Paris in December could mark a turning point in world history. But forging an agreement will require honoring the commitments that have already been made, including promises by developed countries to spend $100 billion a year by 2020 to help the developing world mitigate and adapt to global warming.

WASHINGTON, DC – In less than 80 days, world leaders will have the opportunity to strike a once-in-a-generation agreement in the fight against climate change. The United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris in December could mark a turning point in world history: unanimous recognition of the need to act to prevent the most harmful consequences of global warming.

But if a deal is to be secured, participants in the conference will have to overcome the mistrust that has led to polarization and inaction during past negotiations. Implementing an agreement with robust limits on greenhouse-gas emissions will first require honoring the commitments that have already been made, including promises by developed countries to spend $100 billion a year by 2020 to help the developing world mitigate its contribution to climate change and adapt to a warming world.

Given the scale of the challenge and the costs that inaction imposes on the world’s most vulnerable people, development financial institutions and other interested parties must demonstrate their commitment to preventing the most harmful effects of climate change. Doing so requires a renewed – and transparent – dedication to the effort.

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