Underwriting the Future of Climate Science

As the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change meets for its plenary session in Busan, South Korea, governments will have a valuable opportunity to demonstrate their commitment to climate science. Recent criticism notwithstanding, the IPCC's main conclusions have been affirmed by every major independent inquiry - a record achieved despite the panel's woeful lack of resources.

LONDON – As the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) meets for its plenary session in Busan, South Korea, governments will have a valuable opportunity to demonstrate their commitment to climate science.

Their charge will be to consider a recent review of the IPCC by the InterAcademy Council (IAC). The review, commissioned in March by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon and the Nobel laureate Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the IPCC, to examine the IPCC’s processes and procedures, was published at the end of August.

Several other inquiries have been held, by institutions such as Penn State University, the British Parliament, the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency. All had one thing in common: they all agreed with the IPCC’s fundamental conclusions concerning the major impact of man-made CO2 on climate change. This is a crucial outcome.

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