Skip to main content
A Thai health official performs a blood test on children at a Malaria clinic PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images

Staying on Track to End Malaria

The world has spent decades fighting to eradicate malaria, and has formally committed to doing so by 2030. But despite the remarkable progress that has been made, the emergence of insecticide-resistant mosquitoes and drug-resistant strains of the disease itself show that much work remains to be done.

BASEL – Ending an epidemic is a marathon undertaking, and in the case of malaria, we are nearing the finish line. But we will need to keep up the momentum.

Over the past few decades, governments, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector have broken new ground in the science of treating malaria, and have channeled extraordinary resources toward the cause. The investments have paid off: the global malaria mortality rate fell by 60% between 2000 and 2015.

Still, mounting challenges such as drug and insecticide resistance threaten to reverse the progress we have made. For two consecutive years now, malaria deaths have risen, while funding has flatlined. This year’s World Malaria Day (April 25) should thus spur a redoubling of our efforts. Eradicating malaria will require new medical and health-policy solutions as well as stronger political will.

We hope you're enjoying Project Syndicate.

To continue reading, subscribe now.

Subscribe

Get unlimited access to PS premium content, including in-depth commentaries, book reviews, exclusive interviews, On Point, the Big Picture, the PS Archive, and our annual year-ahead magazine.

Help make our reporting on global health and development issues stronger by answering a short survey.

Take Survey

https://prosyn.org/S6G6QsY;

Handpicked to read next

  1. haass103_GettyImages_redeastasiamapdotslines Getty Images

    Asia’s Scary Movie

    Richard N. Haass

    A snapshot of Asia would show a region at peace, with stable societies, growing economies, and robust alliances. But, if we view history as a moving picture, we may well come to look back on this moment as the time in which the most economically successful part of the world began to come apart.

  2. roubini130_GettyImages_iphonehandstealingpiggybank Getty Images

    The Great Crypto Heist

    Nouriel Roubini

    Cryptocurrencies have given rise to an entire new criminal industry, comprising unregulated offshore exchanges, paid propagandists, and an army of scammers looking to fleece retail investors. Yet, despite the overwhelming evidence of rampant fraud and abuse, financial regulators and law-enforcement agencies remain asleep at the wheel.

Cookies and Privacy

We use cookies to improve your experience on our website. To find out more, read our updated cookie policy and privacy policy.