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Curated by Project Syndicate

The Future of Europe

96 commentaries

After the election of President Emmanuel Macron in France and the return of a centrist grand coalition government in Germany, many hoped that the Franco-German axis would lead the European Union back onto the path of integration. In fact, the EU remains besieged on all sides: not only by Middle East turmoil, a borderline-hostile United States, and the constant threat of Russian aggression, but also from within, by Brexit, populist governments in Central Europe and Italy, and German recalcitrance on institutional reform.

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  1. solana109_robert wallisCorbis via Getty Images_manhittingberlinwall Robert Wallis/Corbis via Getty Images

    The Partial Triumph of 1989

    Javier Solana

    The fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989 marked the end not of a historical chapter, but of a paragraph. Although capitalism currently has no rival, it has proven its compatibility with illiberal forces.

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  2. sachs315_Pablo Rojas MadariagaNurPhoto via Getty Images_chileprotestmanbulletface Pablo Rojas Madariaga/NurPhoto via Getty Images

    Why Rich Cities Rebel

    Jeffrey D. Sachs

    Having lost touch with public sentiment, officials in Paris, Hong Kong, and Santiago failed to anticipate that a seemingly modest policy action (a fuel-tax increase, an extradition bill, and higher metro prices, respectively) would trigger a massive social explosion.

    4

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