Mosul refugee child Delil Souleiman/Stringer

Our Duty to Migrants and Refugees

US President Donald Trump’s executive order blocking Syrian refugees’ entry into the United States has thrown a harsh spotlight on one of the great challenges of our time. What should we do with the millions of refugees fleeing war and persecution around the world?

DHAKA – The indefinite ban on Syrian refugees imposed by the United States has cast a bright spotlight on one of the great challenges of our time. What should we do with the millions of refugees fleeing war and persecution around the world?

The scale of today’s refugee crisis is staggering: worldwide, an unprecedented 65 million people have been forced to flee from their homes; and, in 2016 alone, over 7,500 migrants – men, women, and children – died while desperately trying to reach safety, of which 5,083 perished in the Mediterranean Sea.

In the Andaman Sea, thousands of migrants have been stranded on boats without a port of disembarkation, while traffickers hold them for ransom; similar vulnerabilities have been observed in the Sahel, the Horn of Africa, and the Central American corridor.

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