Long Reads

Saving the International Economic Order

This autumn, the IMF and the World Bank will once again hold their annual conference in Washington, DC. At a time when the liberal international economic order that these institutions underpin is under threat, they cannot afford to stick to business as usual.

LONDON – This autumn, the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank will once again hold their annual conference in Washington, DC. At a time when the liberal world order that these institutions underpin is under threat, they cannot afford to stick with business as usual. Instead, they must consider deep reforms – and that will require abandoning the paternalistic, even hostile, tone that has often dominated discussion of the topic.

Since the election of Donald Trump as US president last November – the culmination of an upsurge in nationalist-populist sentiment across the Western world – the weaknesses of existing multilateral frameworks have come increasingly to the fore. But the current crisis of the liberal world order has been a long time in the making.

In fact, it has been apparent since before the turn of the century that the post-World War II governance structures were untenable, because the assumptions that formed their foundation were beginning to crumble. In particular, with emerging economies, especially China, on the rise, the division between the West and the “rest” was narrowing fast.

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  1. National flags of world countries around Earth globe Getty Images

    Reclaiming Multilateralism

    The time when the World Bank, IMF, and other international institutions could focus solely on technical, financial, and economic issues is over. An era of nationalist resurgence demands a broader, more humanistic form of international engagement.

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