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Safeguarding Ukraine’s Progress

Ukraine’s immediate economic crisis has been resolved, but its economy remains fragile and needs international support from bodies such as the IMF, which approved a new disbursement for the country last month. Still, if Ukraine's new government becomes complacent, the country’s recent gains could be lost.

KYIV – Ukraine’s immediate economic crisis has been resolved, but its economy remains fragile and still needs international support. If the new Ukrainian government becomes complacent, the country’s gains could be lost.

Ukraine has come a long way since the 2013-2014 “Euromaidan” uprising. When former President Viktor Yanukovych fled to Russia in February 2014, the Ukrainian economy was in free-fall, contracting by 17% in just two years. Ukraine’s budget and external deficits had already become unsustainable and needed radical restructuring, so Russian aggression was enough to push the economy over the edge.

By the end of 2015, former Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk had made remarkable progress in sorting out the country’s finances, but only in the areas where he and his technocratic reformers were in charge.

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