brown93_Martin PopeGetty Images_putinwarcriminalprotest Martin Pope/Getty Images
en English

Summon a Special Tribunal for Putin’s Crimes in Ukraine

Since last February, thousands of Ukrainian civilians have been killed or injured, and eight million people have been internally displaced, with another eight million becoming refugees. Russia's aggression and other international crimes – war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide – must be answered for.

LONDON – It is nearly a year since Russia, backed by Belarus, launched one of the largest ground invasions in Europe since World War II’s end.

Since then, thousands of Ukrainian civilians have been killed or injured, eight million people have been internally displaced, with another eight million becoming refugees. Civilian infrastructure and economic assets worth tens of billions of dollars have been destroyed or plundered. Irreplaceable cultural monuments have been reduced to rubble. Large swathes of Ukrainian territory remain under occupation or attack.

If proven in court, these acts of aggression could constitute what the post-WWII Nuremberg trials termed the “supreme international crime.” For it is the crime of aggression from which most other international crimes – war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide – often flow.

To continue reading, register now.

Subscribe now for unlimited access to everything PS has to offer.

Subscribe

As a registered user, you can enjoy more PS content every month – for free.

Register

https://prosyn.org/v9Im754