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Russia's Language is in the Soup

Three hundred years ago Peter the Great cut a window into Europe. Foreign languages flooded into Russia: English, Dutch, French, and Italian. Today, new words and cultural concepts are also arriving in Russia at breathtaking speed. Sometimes they add to, sometimes they replace, Russian analogues.

For example, Russia has had "shti" (cabbage soup), "ukha" (fish soup), "pokhlebka" (everything soup), "selyanka" (peasant soup), "botviniya" (cold beet soup), "okroshka" (spring vegetable soup). Now bullion, consommé, and even simply "soup" have arrived. There was less, now we have more. Isn't this good?

But somebody thinks that all the old words should be deleted from our memories, that only one word -- soup -- should remain. Soup; soup in general, with no variations. Everything we eat with a spoon is soup; everything we eat with a fork is not soup. In all our menus we have soup - just that.

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