My Plan to Drop the Bomb

Sixty-three years after the world agreed to pursue nuclear disarmament, and 39 years after the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty entered into force, more than 20,000 such weapons reportedly remain, with many still on high alert. But after a decade of inaction, disarmament is back on the international agenda.

NEW YORK – The destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 marked an end and a beginning.  The close of the Second World War ushered in a Cold War, with a precarious peace based on the threat of mutually assured destruction. 

Today the world is at another turning point.  The assumption that nuclear weapons are indispensable to keeping the peace is crumbling.  Disarmament is back on the global agenda – and not a moment too soon. A groundswell of new international initiatives will soon emerge to move this agenda forward.

The Cold War’s end, twenty years ago this autumn, was supposed to provide a peace dividend.  Instead, we find ourselves still facing serious nuclear threats.  Some stem from the persistence of more than 20,000 nuclear weapons and the contagious doctrine of nuclear deterrence.  Others relate to nuclear tests—more than a dozen in the post-Cold War era, aggravated by the constant testing of long-range missiles. Still others arise from concerns that more countries or even terrorists might be seeking the bomb. 

To continue reading, please log in or enter your email address.

To access our archive, please log in or register now and read two articles from our archive every month for free. For unlimited access to our archive, as well as to the unrivaled analysis of PS On Point, subscribe now.

required

By proceeding, you agree to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy, which describes the personal data we collect and how we use it.

Log in

http://prosyn.org/5i4uRMK;

Cookies and Privacy

We use cookies to improve your experience on our website. To find out more, read our updated cookie policy and privacy policy.