Macron crowd Vincent Isore/IP3/Getty Images

Macron and a Sixth Republic?

The arrival of a centrist, pro-Europe technocrat in France’s powerful presidency is being widely hailed as auguring a turnaround in the EU’s fortunes. In fact, it may turn out to be anything but, with serious consequences for France itself and for hopes of a revival of the EU’s popularity.

BRUSSELS – The writing is on the wall: After six decades, France’s Fifth Republic looks set to give way to a sixth. Sooner or later, such an upheaval could become the chief outcome of Emmanuel Macron’s election victory.

The arrival of a centrist, pro-Europe technocrat in France’s powerful presidency is being widely hailed as auguring a turnaround in the European Union’s fortunes. In fact, it may turn out to be anything but, with serious consequences for France itself and for hopes of a revival of the EU’s popularity.

Even while the votes were being counted and the scale of Macron’s win was becoming clear, the noisy election night debates between France’s warring politicians pointed to an increasingly uncertain future. Macron’s presidency will rely on the degree of consensus within the National Assembly, and that has been in short supply in recent years.

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