A New-Model NATO

NATO’s current “Strategic Concept” was adopted in 1999, but the world has changed dramatically since then. Mere reaction is no longer sufficient, for today’s most urgent task is prevention of crises, armed conflict, and war.

                                                          John M. Shalikashvili

Berlin -- NATO needs a new strategy. We, five former Defense Chiefs of Staff, recently published a booklet containing proposals for such a new strategy, as well as a comprehensive agenda for change.

Why is a new strategy needed? NATO’s current “Strategic Concept” was adopted in 1999, but since then the world has changed dramatically. At that time, NATO was a regional alliance that concentrated on the reactive defense of the Treaty Area. But reaction is no longer sufficient; today’s most urgent task is prevention of crises, armed conflict, and war which may require that the primary response be other than by military means.

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