Friday, August 22, 2014
  1. World Affairs

    The Middle East’s Three Timelines

    Volker Perthes
    World Affairs

    The Middle East’s Three Timelines

    1

     explores the short-, medium-, and long-term factors shaping developments in the Middle East.

    Israeli Bombs hit Gaza City Mohammed Othman/ZumaPress

    Three distinct timelines are shaping developments in the Middle East: the short -term timeline of daily struggles and politics; the medium-term timeline of geopolitical shifts; and the long-term timeline of sociocultural transformation. Understanding each is essential to craft an effective strategy in the region. READ MORE

  2. Economics

    Italy’s Downward Spiral

    Hans-Werner Sinn
    Economics

    Italy’s Downward Spiral

    6

     argues that the economy's long slump reflects the failure of officials to address the real problem.

    Downward spiral CTRLF5/Flickr

    Italy is now in a triple-dip recession. But it didn’t get there by itself: Though the economy’s long slide reflects Italian leaders’ failure to confront the country's loss of competitiveness, it is a failure that is widely shared in Europe. READ MORE

  3. Global Health & Development

    Measuring Inclusive Growth

    Mahmoud Mohieldin
    Global Health & Development

    Measuring Inclusive Growth

    0

     advocates making "natural capital accounting" central to the post-2015 development agenda.

    Deforestation declining ecosystems UN ISDR/Flickr

    Creating a more sustainable world requires us to redefine “growth” in a way that encompasses a wide range of economic, social, and environmental factors, not just income. This attests to the importance of “natural capital accounting,” which assesses the value of natural resources in development planning and national accounts. READ MORE

  4. Economics

    A European Lost Decade?

    Michael Heise
  5. Politics

    Fixing Europe’s Orbán Problem

    Thorsten Benner
    Politics

    Fixing Europe’s Orbán Problem

    &  demand that EU leaders force Hungary's authoritarian prime minister to change course.

    Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Urban Imago/ZumaPress

    In April, when German Chancellor Angel Merkel congratulated Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán on his reelection, she let it be known that his large majority implied a “special responsibility” to use good judgment and behave with sensitivity toward opponents. But Orbán has done exactly the opposite, with the EU doing nothing to stop him. READ MORE

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