Friday, May 22, 2015
  1. Escaping the Middle East’s Violence Trap

    Adeel Malik, ET AL

    Escaping the Middle East’s Violence Trap

    & 5

    &  explain why economic cooperation will be necessary for political stability in the region.

    Violence in Syria Karam Almasri/ZumaPress

    The Arab world and its neighbors are stuck in a violence trap. Indeed, by redrawing the region’s economic boundaries, the latest wave of violence has brought about a veritable trade shock, the true scale and significance of which has largely gone unnoticed. READ MORE

  2. Keeping Europe’s Eastern Promise

    Yuliya Tymoshenko

    Keeping Europe’s Eastern Promise

    6

     calls on the European Union to revive its Eastern Partnership initiative, starting with Ukraine.

    ukranian girl with flowers Krystian Dobuszynski/ZumaPress

    The upcoming EU summit in Riga, where the Union’s tattered Eastern Partnership tops the agenda, can and must demonstrate Europe’s determination to defend its unity, security, and values in the face of Russian aggression. And it must do so in concrete ways, not simply with quickly forgotten official communiqués. READ MORE

  3. Channeling China’s Aspirations

    Mark Roe

    Channeling China’s Aspirations

    7

     argues that economic engagement will reduce, if not eliminate, the risk of military confrontation.

    china aircraft carrier Zeng Tao/ZumPress

    The closer China’s economic ties with the rest of the world become, the more it will have to lose from a breakdown in international relations. It is better that China be convinced that economic engagement is the best way to project power than for its leaders to conclude that military confrontation is the only viable path to respect. READ MORE

  4. International Norms in Cyberspace

    Joseph S. Nye
  5. Germany v. Google

    Philippe Legrain

    Germany v. Google

    17

     traces the EU’s assault on US tech companies to protectionist forces in its largest economy.

    Google CEO Eric Schmidt Park Jin Hee/ZumaPress

    The key driver of the EU’s onslaught against American tech companies is not concern for the welfare of ordinary Europeans; it is the lobbying power of protectionist German businesses. Rather than try to protect its digital flops, Germany should practice what it preaches and make the difficult reforms it needs to raise its game. READ MORE

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