Friday, October 28, 2016

The Scramble for Asia

Brahma Chellaney

Can Asia’s current arms race be contained before it becomes uncontrollable? Can a resurgent Japan live in peace with a risen China? Will Narendra Modi bring about his promised economic miracle in India? Can Pakistan tame the Taliban monster that it created? Whither America’s “pivot to Asia”?

Today, China, India, and Japan – alongside the United States – are all vying for mastery in Asia, while the rise of other Asian powers, ranging from Indonesia to South Korea to Vietnam, serve to intensify their rivalries. Indeed, the increasingly open competition between these states will likely determine the future of the global economy and the entire international order in the twenty-first century.

Every month in The Scramble for Asia, Brahma Chellaney addresses the great questions facing Asia today: the likely future trajectories of its key players and the legacy of their often poisonous relations with one another. Chellaney, one of the world’s most authoritative commentators on international affairs, brings the depth of knowledge and the cosmopolitan mindset needed to understand the dynamics of the region and explain its power rivalries to the wider world.

A professor of strategic studies at the New Delhi-based Center for Policy Research, Chellaney is the author of nine books, including the acclaimed studies Water: Asia’s New Battleground and Asian Juggernaut, and a former adviser to India’s National Security Council. In The Scramble for Asia, written exclusively for Project Syndicate, he examines the world’s most rapidly evolving economies and societies, assesses the challenges to America’s global leadership posed by China’s rise, and predicts where the next regional flashpoints and power plays are likely to erupt.

With Asia’s future certain to shape that of the world, shouldn’t your readers benefit from Brahma Chellaney’s unique perspective and prescient analysis?

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