Why Bipartisanship is Good Politics

Like most recent American presidents, Barack Obama campaigned on a promise to work with his political opponents for the greater good of the country, and he has gone further than most in trying to do so. Some commentators have called that a mistake, but it is the Republicans who will ultimately regret their rejection of bipartisanship.

LONDON – Bipartisanship seems to have taken a drubbing in Washington since President Barack Obama got to the White House.

Like most recent American presidents, Obama campaigned on a promise to work with his political opponents for the greater good of the country. Bill Clinton said much the same thing before he was elected, and then spent his first term in a knockdown fight with Newt Gingrich’s Republican majority in Congress, and his second term fighting off impeachment.

George W. Bush also said that he would reach out to those who disagreed with him. He then turned into the most partisan and ideological president of modern times, egged on by his vice-president, Dick Cheney.

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