delong178_Mark Wilson_Getty Images_ACA protest Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Beating America’s Health-Care Monopolists

In 2015, the largest private US health-insurers began exploring the possibility of mergers that would reduce the number of national providers from five to three and allow them to squeeze more profits from consumers. After a massive industry lobbying effort almost pushed the plan through, consumer groups are fighting back.

BERKELEY – The United States’ Affordable Care Act (ACA), President Barack Obama’s signature 2010 health-care reform, has significantly increased the need for effective antitrust enforcement in health-insurance markets. Despite recent good news on this front, the odds remain stacked against consumers.

As Berkeley economics professor Aaron Edlin has pointed out, consumer abstention is the ultimate competitor. Companies cannot purchase or contrive a solution to consumers who say, “I’m just not going to buy this.” But the ACA requires individuals to purchase health insurance, thus creating a vertical demand curve for potential monopolists. Under these conditions, profits – and consumer abuse – can be maximized through collusion.

It is not surprising, then, that in 2015 some of the largest private American health-insurance companies – Anthem, Cigna, Aetna, and Humana – began exploring the possibility of merging. If they could reduce the number of national insurers from five to three, they could then increase their market power and squeeze more profits from consumers.

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