The Way Ahead on Climate Change

The financial crisis will be uppermost in the minds of many at this week’s United Nations climate change conference in Poznan, Poland. Yet, however high the price of a global bail-out, we know one thing: it pales next to the enormous costs – and profound human consequences – of delaying action on climate change.

NEW YORK – The financial crisis has been uppermost in the minds of most world leaders. Yet, however high the price of a global bail-out, we know one thing: it pales next to the enormous costs – and profound human consequences – of delaying action on climate change.

There is a sort of beauty in this predicament: if we act wisely, we can tackle both crises at once. Climate change negotiations over the next year offer an unprecedented opportunity to build a more profitable, safer, and sustainable global economy.  

Today’s challenges – finance, food, and energy, for example – are many. Yet they share a root cause, whereby speculative and often narrow interests have superseded the common interest, common responsibilities, and common sense.

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