The March of Folly in Afghanistan

It now seems clear to anyone with eyes that the invasion of Afghanistan was built upon the great miscalculation that Afghanistan can be successfully invaded. The realization of this historical truth, which the Wikileaks exposure of raw US intelligence data has brought home, is now troubling today’s invaders.

NEW DELHI – When the Wikileaks exposé of raw United States intelligence data and reports from Afghanistan hit computers worldwide, commentators in Pakistan reacted with vitriolic broadsides. One spoke of “Neocon vampires…blood-thirsty Islamaphobes…think tank irredentists…(Indian) revanchists…planning another dismemberment, so that they (can) continue their blood-fest in…Afghanistan.” Strong words, particularly when compared to US Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, who was only “mortified” and “appalled” by the leaks.

The leaks provoked such fiery debate because the US-led fight against “jihadism” had suddenly run into an unexpected adversary: truth. Indeed, it now seems clear to anyone with eyes that the invasion of Afghanistan was built upon a great miscalculation: that Afghanistan can be successfully invaded.

Throughout history, such undertakings have always floundered. The country may, perhaps, be occupied for a time, but only temporarily; it cannot be conquered. The realization of this historical truth, which the Wikileaks affair has brought home, is now troubling today’s invaders.

To continue reading, please log in or enter your email address.

To continue reading, please log in or register now. After entering your email, you'll have access to two free articles every month. For unlimited access to Project Syndicate, subscribe now.

required

By proceeding, you are agreeing to our Terms and Conditions.

Log in

http://prosyn.org/oB7rU1r;

Cookies and Privacy

We use cookies to improve your experience on our website. To find out more, read our updated cookie policy and privacy policy.