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The Trumping of US Foreign Policy

In this year's US presidential campaign, Hillary Clinton has promised voters continuity in foreign policy, while her Republican opponent, Donald Trump, has proposed a radically different approach. And yet, as scary as that prospect may be, Trump is a secondary issue – a symptom of the transformation of the Republican Party itself.

DENVER – The United States’ presidential campaign, already long and tumultuous, will no doubt become even more so in the coming months, as the two parties’ nominees, now officially selected, face off ahead of November’s election. But voters will have a clear choice before them, especially with regard to foreign policy.

The Democratic Party’s nominee, Hillary Clinton, promises continuity. A Clinton administration would remain a willing partner to America’s friends and allies, and it would make clear to America’s adversaries that the broad tenets of US foreign policy will not change. Current US policy, rooted in strength and guided by pragmatism, has been generally successful in ensuring peace and stability for decades.

Quite a different vision has emerged on the Republican side, with the nomination of Donald Trump. And yet the candidate is a secondary issue – a symptom of the rapid transformation of the Grand Old Party itself, which has been a bewildering spectacle for American and foreign audiences alike.

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