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 Protestors shout as they march down Sixth Avenue during the March For Our Lives Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The New Global Youth Movement

Almost a century ago, Eglantyne Jebb, who founded Save the Children, said that the only language everybody could understand was the cry of a child. But as today's young people connect, communicate, and assert their rights, their cries are less likely to be tearful pleas for charity than defiant marches demanding justice.

LONDON – The recent March for Our Lives in the United States inspired millions not just across America, but also around the world. Until the nationwide demonstrations on March 24, most people thought that little new could be added to the conversation about the seemingly endless rounds of gun killings.

Yet the brave and moving way in which, out of their anguish and pain, young people told the world that decisions on gun laws and safe schools are too important to be left to adults who had let them down has reshaped the political landscape, perhaps permanently and fundamentally.

It’s not just in America that a youth-led revolution is coming alive. Around the world, young people are becoming a power in their own right. Millions of young people are now engaged in what has become the civil-rights struggle of our time – the fight for every child’s right to go to school, and to do so in safety.

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