ILO Asia/Pacific

Fiscal Discipline and Educational Quality

In a post-industrial age in which manufacturing is becoming ever more complex and competition has become global, countries increasingly need a highly skilled and educated workforce. The first step is to create a sound macroeconomic basis for high-quality, accessible schools.

ANKARA – The world is moving into a post-industrial age in which manufacturing is becoming ever more complex and competition has become global. To succeed, countries increasingly need a highly skilled and educated workforce. Therefore, raising the level of skills conferred by secondary schools has become an urgent priority for developing and developed countries alike.

For me, the issue of education is no mere academic matter. I was born into a family of nine children. My parents were illiterate, and none of my sisters attended school beyond the primary level. However, in my family’s next generation, all of my nieces and nephews have a high-school diploma and most have attended university.

Improving the education system of a country with more than 16 million primary and secondary school students – more than the combined population of 20 European Union member states – poses considerable fiscal challenges. So the first step is to create a sound macroeconomic basis for reform.

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