Japan, Inc.’s Communication Gap

If Toyota and other Japanese companies want to become truly global, their managers must learn to communicate effectively with all their foreign stakeholders. In this global age, the language of business is English, which senior managers at Toyota and most other Japanese multinational companies have little interest in mastering.

GENEVA – Whatever happens to Toyota following the forced recall of millions of its autos, its story will remain legendary. Toyota’s rise from humble origins as the “offspring” of a family textile machinery company in a remote area of central Japan to become the dominant global automobile maker and a synonym for quality is astonishing. Along with a small number of other Japanese corporate icons – for example, Sony, Honda, and Canon – Toyota was the bright star of the Japanese economic miracle and global challenge.

It remains to be seen whether Toyota’s current problems are temporary or irreversible. Its current difficulties notwithstanding, it retains tremendous advantages – and in any case, the competition is not that much greater. But, to ensure their global position, Toyota – and most other Japanese multinational corporations – needs a cultural transformation.

As was vividly illustrated by the delays by its chairman and CEO (and grandson of the founder), Akio Toyoda, in responding to calls to appear before the US Congress, Toyota has a serious global communication problem. That problem is a reflection of a broader Japanese weakness in foreign languages, especially English. But as a dominant global player and the world’s biggest automobile company, that excuse is just not good enough.

To continue reading, please log in or enter your email address.

To access our archive, please log in or register now and read two articles from our archive every month for free. For unlimited access to our archive, as well as to the unrivaled analysis of PS On Point, subscribe now.

required

By proceeding, you agree to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy, which describes the personal data we collect and how we use it.

Log in

http://prosyn.org/FZMo2LJ;

Cookies and Privacy

We use cookies to improve your experience on our website. To find out more, read our updated cookie policy and privacy policy.