How to Emerge from the Crisis in 2009

In the maelstrom of events and news that characterize the current global crisis, it is often difficult to keep a clear head and a sense of what is really going on. But when one takes a step back from the market turmoil, the picture becomes clearer, and so do the required policies.

WASHINGTON, DC – In the maelstrom of events and news that characterize the current global crisis, it is often difficult to keep a clear head and a sense of what is really going on. But when one takes a step back (something easier to do on days when markets are closed), the picture becomes clearer, and so do the required policies.

Let me first set the scene by making three observations on where we are today. First, in the advanced countries, we have probably seen the worst of the financial crisis. There are still land mines, from unknowable credit default swap (CDS) positions to hidden losses on balance sheets, but the worst days of frozen money markets and obscene risk spreads are probably over. 

Second, and unfortunately, the financial crisis has moved to emerging countries. In crossing borders, the sharp portfolio reallocations and the rush to safer assets are creating not only financial but also exchange-rate crises. Add to this the drop in output in advanced countries, and you can see how emerging countries now suffer from both higher credit costs and decreased export demand.

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