Europe’s Essential Unity

Over the past ten years, the EU has endured a series of unprecedented crises, the likes of which it is unlikely to see again. But other, no less daunting challenges lie ahead, and Europeans would do well to remember the lessons learned along the way.

BRUSSELS – Over the past ten years, the European Union has endured a series of unprecedented crises, the likes of which we are unlikely to see again. But other, no less daunting challenges lie ahead, and we would do well to remember the lessons learned along the way.

One lesson is that unity is not an option; it is a condition sine qua non of the EU’s economic prosperity and political relevance. It is remarkable that since 2004, when I became President of the European Commission, the EU’s membership has nearly doubled, from 15 countries then to 28 now.

There have been no defections. From 2004 to 2014, we enlarged both the EU and the eurozone. Most important, we have kept Europe united.

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