Do Antioxidant Supplements Work?

Antioxidants, which are found in fruits and vegetables, are believed to help protect us against cancer and heart disease, fueling widespread consumption of antioxidant supplements. But studies suggest that such supplements may have little benefit--and could cause harm.

NIS, Serbia – The influence of diet on health has been known since the Ancient Greeks. Our bodies simply cannot synthesize many essential compounds, so our health partly depends on what we eat and drink.

Antioxidants, which are believed to help protect us against both cancer and heart disease, are one such element that must import into our bodies. Studies have shown that there is a significant positive association between a higher intake of fruits and vegetables and reduced risk of chronic disease.

Fruits and vegetables are sources of numerous micronutrients, and some, including b-carotene (a precursor of vitamin A), vitamin C, vitamin E, and selenium, have potential as antioxidants. But what specifically makes fruits and vegetables so beneficial is not clear.

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