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Making Every Development Dollar Count

In international polls and on the world stage, developing countries are very clear about their priorities: improved healthcare and education, more and better jobs, less corruption, and solutions to nutritional challenges. Unfortunately, these areas are not necessarily where rich countries direct funds.

PRAGUE – In 2017, $146 billion was spent on aid and development. Even this large sum remains a fraction of what would be needed to achieve the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Yet, despite the scarce resources, there is surprisingly little discussion about setting priorities in development spending.

In international polls and on the world stage, developing countries are very clear about their priorities: improved healthcare and education, more and better jobs, less corruption, and solutions to nutritional challenges. Unfortunately, these areas are not necessarily where rich countries direct funds.

In fact, if current trends hold, the world will fail to achieve the SDGs’ targets for 2030 in a host of areas: maternal mortality, tuberculosis, family planning access, HIV, non-communicable disease mortality, pre-primary and primary school access, stunting, wasting, undernourishment, violence against women, birth registration, water access, gender equality in public leadership, sanitation access, and air pollution.

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