A Silk Glove for China’s Iron Fist

NEW DELHI – For years, China has sought to encircle South Asia with a “string of pearls": a network of ports connecting its eastern coast to the Middle East that would boost its strategic clout and maritime access. Not surprisingly, India and others have regarded this process with serious concern.

Now, however, China is attempting to disguise its strategy, claiming that it wants to create a twenty-first-century maritime Silk Road to improve trade and cultural exchange. But friendly rhetoric can scarcely allay concern in Asia and beyond that China's strategic goal is to dominate the region.

That concern is well founded. Simply put, the Silk Road initiative is designed to make China the hub of a new order in Asia and the Indian Ocean region. Indeed, by working to establish its dominance along major trade arteries, while instigating territorial and maritime disputes with several neighbors, China is attempting to redraw Asia's geopolitical map.

The strategic dimension of the maritime Silk Road is underscored by the fact that the People's Liberation Army has led the debate on the subject. The PLA National Defense University's Major General Ji Mingkui argues that the initiative can help China to craft a “new image" and “win influence," especially as the US “pivot" to Asia “loses momentum."