Asia’s Hour?

As Asia appears to be emerging from the global economic crisis more quickly than the rest of the world, it is increasingly clear that the world’s center of gravity is shifting from the Atlantic to the Pacific. But it is equally clear that Asian states are not yet ready to assume the global leadership role needed to ensure that this tectonic shift makes the world more stable and secure.

NEW YORK – As Asia emerges from the global economic crisis faster than the rest of the world, it is increasingly clear that the world’s center of gravity is shifting from the Atlantic to the Pacific. It is equally clear that Asian states are not yet ready to assume the more meaningful leadership in global affairs that will be necessary to ensure that this tectonic shift can make the world more stable and secure than it has been. Asian states have a tremendous opportunity to rise to this challenge.

The signs of Asia’s rise are unmistakable. Over the past five years, China’s contribution to world GDP growth has steadily increased from one-fifth to one-third, and India’s from approximately 6% to 16%. Given their growing footprints on global economics, politics, and the environment, it is now impossible to imagine any major international agreement without China, Japan, and India on board.

China, in particular, has emerged as the key counterpart to the United States in almost all major global forums, as well as international platforms for discussing critical transnational issues, from the Six-Party Talks with North Korea and the G-20 to talks about climate change. Some even call for establishing a US-China G-2.

To continue reading, please log in or enter your email address.

To read this article from our archive, please log in or register now. After entering your email, you'll have access to two free articles from our archive every month. For unlimited access to Project Syndicate, subscribe now.

required

By proceeding, you agree to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy, which describes the personal data we collect and how we use it.

Log in

http://prosyn.org/W11H8p4;

Cookies and Privacy

We use cookies to improve your experience on our website. To find out more, read our updated cookie policy and privacy policy.