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pa4076c.jpg Paul Lachine

An African Horn of Plenty

The famine in Somalia has ended, but, across the Horn of Africa, 14.5 million children and adults remain without enough food. No one can prevent droughts from occurring, but the international community can make the region more resilient to them..

ROME – After six months and the deaths of tens of thousands of people, the famine in Somalia – caused by the worst drought in 60 years – is over. But a wider crisis in Africa continues.

In the Horn of Africa – Somalia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, South Sudan, and Sudan – some 14.6 million children, women, and men remain without enough food. While to the west, in the Sahel countries of Niger, Chad, Mali, Burkina Faso, and Mauritania, another 14 million are threatened.

Even worse, there is a high risk in Somalia that famine will recur unless coordinated, long-term action is taken. We cannot avoid droughts, but we can try to prevent them from becoming famines.

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