Skip to main content

Cookies and Privacy

We use cookies to improve your experience on our website. To find out more, read our updated Cookie policy, Privacy policy and Terms & Conditions

modi_bp_GettyImages1164152413 NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP via Getty Images

Whose India?

Democracies are in crisis around the world, but Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government stood out in 2019 for its brazen assaults on pluralism and minority rights. Will the world's largest democracy still be one a decade from now?

In this Big Picture, Mahatma Gandhi's biographer, Ramachandra Guha, who was recently arrested while participating in a peaceful protest, fears that India's post-independence model of democracy and interfaith comity could be replaced by ethno-nationalist authoritarianism. Echoing those fears, Shashi Tharoor of the Congress party explains why a recently introduced citizenship law represents such a stark departure from the country's tradition of religious toleration.

Moreover, Jayati Ghosh of Jawaharlal Nehru University points out that Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party have exploited broader economic anxieties stemming from weakening growth and mismanagement. Worse, as Ramesh Thakur of Australian National University explains, the government's focus on political expediency all but ensures that economic conditions will not improve – and could grow worse.

We hope you're enjoying Project Syndicate.

To continue reading, subscribe now.

Subscribe

Get unlimited access to PS premium content, including in-depth commentaries, book reviews, exclusive interviews, On Point, the Big Picture, the PS Archive, and our annual year-ahead magazine.

https://prosyn.org/qUkizLt;