Tuesday, December 1, 2015
  1. Failure at the Financial Stability Board

    Simon Johnson

    Failure at the Financial Stability Board


     finds three fatal flaws in a new set of recommendations for regulating global banks.


    At least since the fall of 2008, leading economies’ officials have agreed – in principle – that something must be done about financial firms that are “too big to fail.” But a recent report released by the Financial Stability Board underscores how little progress has been made. READ MORE

  2. The Import of Exports

    Ricardo Hausmann

    The Import of Exports


     argues that countries are right to pay special attention to nurturing tradable activities.

    Shipping containers.

    Many people wonder whether exports, which aim to satisfy the needs of distant foreign consumers, belong at the center of a country's development strategy. But this is the wrong question: in a market economy, fulfilling the needs of others is the source of our own livelihood. READ MORE

  3. A Future-Oriented US Fiscal Policy

    Glenn Hubbard

    A Future-Oriented US Fiscal Policy


     argues that reforms to Social Security and Medicare are vital to enable broadly shared prosperity.

    Chicago skyline.

    America's presidential candidates are finally engaging in a long-overdue conversation about the economy. Unfortunately, few seem to recognize that reforms that make Social Security and Medicare sustainable are the key to ensuring broadly shared prosperity. READ MORE

  4. A Banker’s Revolution

    Alfred Hannig

    A Banker’s Revolution


     lauds innovative efforts by central banks in the developing world to broaden financial inclusion.

    Man trading stocks online

    Financial regulators are generally known for taking a measured and cautious approach to change. But in the developed world, that reputation is being turned upside down, as central bankers embrace innovative approaches in their quest to broaden participation in the formal financial system. READ MORE

  5. Terrorism and Trust

    Lucy P. Marcus

    Terrorism and Trust


     sees an important lesson for companies in the aftermath of the Paris attacks.

    Louvre in Paris, France.

    As the world comes to terms with the wider implications and consequences of the terrorist atrocity in Paris, an important story risks being lost in the welter of coverage and analysis: The increasingly vital role that private companies play in planning for and responding to emergencies. And there’s more to the story than that. READ MORE

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